A Longstanding Heated Debate That Can Be Easily Resolved

One of the most notable findings in the original “Freakonomics” is how the authors related the legalization of abortion in the 1970s to the increase in crime that did not happen that had been anticipated for the 1990s.  Their theory was that a rise in abortion meant that fewer unwanted children were growing up in the sort of difficult circumstances that increase the likelihood of criminality.  Here you should read or reread the healthy memory blog post “Turning on Genes in the Brain.”  It notes that the single best predictor for the healthy growth of a baby is to ask its mother, “Did you want this child?”  Research has documented what happens to children whose mother answered “No” to this question.  The short answer is a troubled childhood followed by a troubled adulthood (Read the blog  for justification for this statement), with adverse consequences to society.

You should also read or reread the healthy memory blog “Domains of Knowledge.”  There are many domains of knowledge, but two especially that should be kept distinct:  science and religion.  Historically, religion has tried to stand in the way of science; fortunately, it failed, or our existence today would be quite primitive.   Even today there are religious people who interfere with the accurate teaching of science, with the implication of policies based on science,  and with the conducting of important research.

Biological life is essentially irrelevant to religion.  Souls are what is important.

Imagine someone is being questioned by God or one of his subordinates as he tries to enter heaven and argues that he is entitled to enter because he is pro-life.  God might well be insulted and ask, “Don’t you think I’m a loving and merciful God?  Do you think I advocate a policy that not only makes the child’s life miserable, but also does myriad damages to society?.  Or do you think I am a vengeful God and want to punish someone who did not follow my commandments even though that punishment would have many adverse effects?  Or do you think that I am incompetent and am incapable of saving the soul when physical life is destroyed?

HM would not have this problem as he is pro-quality life.  There might be other obstacles to prevent him from entering heaven, but he would get a pass on the abortion question.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , ,

One Response to “A Longstanding Heated Debate That Can Be Easily Resolved”

  1. russvane3 Says:

    This entry has four ideas that I have distilled. I am still thinking about whether they are very close to the truth or are mostly opinion.

    1. Souls are more important to God than life. This may be true, but He didn’t create life willy-nilly, I am not sure why. It is certainly a temporary house for a soul. The soul is eternal. So I can entertain this reasoning as close to true.

    2. God’s reasoning about eternal merit is based on what we do. Clearly Scripture says differently. Murderers can go to heaven. So Christ’s atoning sacrifice must be their entrance fee. The other reasoning is thoughtful, but not based on what God says counts.

    3. Throughout history people have come from abused, broken situations and become saints as well as evil-doers. So Freakonomics was clearly wrong. And people have become spoiled, self-indulgent murderers from wealthy ones – as per Menendez sons in California.

    4. The relationship of science and theology is much deeper. If you are interested, I would like to comment on this tomorrow.

    Be well!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: