Some Serious Defects with How Attention Works

The subtitle to Dr. Stefan Van Der Stigchel’s book is “Finding Your Way in a World Full of Distraction.” This book discusses visual perception ignoring all the other senses. More importantly, it ignores cognitive processes such as thinking and solving problems, where attentional processes assume even greater importance.
The book is valuable in explaining the role not only that attention pays in vision, but also the need for information selection because perception is already overwhelmed. So the first problem is that the title over promises. It discusses only vision ignoring the majority of attentional processes.

Although Dr. Van Der Stigchel clearly is quite knowledgeable regarding attention and vision, he is woefully ignorant of important research in other areas. If only if he read the healthymemory blog post he would know of the research documenting the demands new technology is placing on our limited attentional process, and how that demand is degrading cognitive performance.

He makes the statement that he thinks that these concerns are ill-founded and even offers the suggestion, that he clearly pulled out of his keister, that he thinks the demands being placed on visual processing might actually improve performance in other areas of cognition.

There are two problems here. One is that he appears to be woefully ignorant of the relevant research in the area. The second is that it is professionally irresponsible to make statements in which one is ignorant regarding the relevant research.

There is also another problem that HM and his spouse regard as a shortcoming. They are disturbed about the number of people who cross the street failing to look to see if any cars are coming. The problem is not that drivers are homicidal, but there are limitations which should have been explained in this book. The driver’s attention can be distracted or the driver can be suffering information overload. This problem has significantly increased since the introduction of the smartphone. It is almost certain that pedestrian injuries and fatalities have increased, but HM has no data or anecdotes other than personal to report. But there have been accidents where passengers exiting a bus, crossing in front of the bus, but failing to note oncoming traffic. Deaths have resulted and drivers have suffered severe guilt from the accidents, even though the drivers are not at fault. This is the reason that drivers have to stop and not pass school busses when they have stopped for passengers. The assumption that all adults are too experienced to make this childhood mistake is wrong.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original conte

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