Sensory Reactivation Hypothesis

This post is based on information in an important book by Scott D. Slotnick titled “Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory.” The sensory reactivation hypothesis states that memory for an event can activate the same brain regions associated with the perception of that event. These sensory memory effects reflect the contents of memory for a visual experience containing visual information.

There is a large body of research supporting the memory sensory reactivation hypothesis. Memory for visual information, language information (sounds or words), movement information (actions, and olfactory information reactivate the corresponding regions of the brain.) Within the visual process regions, there is also evidence that memory for faces and houses activate the fusiform face area (FFA) and the parahippocampal place area (PPA), respectively.

Evidence has also accumulated that memory for specific features activate the corresponding feature processing brain region. Memory for shape activates the lateral occipital complex (LOC), memory for colors activates V8, memory for items in the left visual field or right visual field activate the extra striate cortex in the opposite/contralateral hemisphere, and memory for motion activates region MT.

The concept of mental practice is relevant here. Athletes or performers mentally rehearse the activities they will need to perform. This mental rehearsal activates the relevant brain areas and the communications that need to be made to perform these activities. And this mental practice has beneficial effects on performance.

This is good to keep in mind if the weather or other complications preclude regular practice. Idle moments can be filled with mental rehearsal to make best use of one’s time.

Similarly one can use this sensory reactivation to re-experience pleasant experiences, be it an view, vacation highlights, sporting events, enjoyable meals. One can get maximum value for one’s entertainment dollar in this manner.

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