Overreliance on Technology

This is the second post based on the book by doreen dodgen-magee titled “DEVICED: Balancing Life and Technology in a Digital World.” Dr. dodgen-magee writes of physicians during their residencies having to be with a patient while at the same time fulfilling the medical system’s need for a thorough and hyper-timely digital record for each appointment. The residents say that computers—installed in such a way as to hover almost directly between the physician and the patient—felt like a constant, tangible presence in the room that demanded the kind of attention that had previously been dedicated solely to the patient. Although providing access to increased helpful data, they also impacted the fulness of the personal encounter. The author concludes, “When a digital device is engaged during an embodied human encounter, what is each party’s relationship to the device, and how its the intimacy of the encounter affected? If it is affected, what are we doing to address or control for this? The reality into which we are evolving in many settings is one wherein determining how to handle the potentially disruptive powers of technology is a complex and ever-moving task, often largely outside our personal control.

The author writes about a dynamic at play with technology. We use it a little bit and find it to be “tasty” in ways our embodied lives aren’t. We begin using it to save time here and there and suddenly we’re investing the moments we’ve saved back into our technology engagement. Getting comfortable with their use, we think that more use might offer us increasing amounts of free time, social connection, learning, and entertainment. Before we know it we are spending large amounts of our lives in digital spaces. Instead of being a side dish or accompaniment to our embodied life they have taken center stage. Although engagement with technology has the capacity to result in increases in creativity, collaboration, socialization, visual reaction time, and visual spatial awareness, there is plenty of potential for less than ideal consequences as well. Disruptions to our physical bodies as well as to our inter-and interpersonal lives are well documented.

She writes that throughout our lifespan, we move across a developmental continuum. We are faced with experiences and opportunities the move us forward, push us backward, or interrupt our journey. Both “positive” (mastering the ability to functions as an autonomous self, committing to relationships with both people and communities, finding one’s passion) and “negative” (significant loss or rejection, failures, discovery of limitations) life events hold opportunities for forward or reverse movement. Usually, we move in adaptive ways, making steps forward and backward and rolling with the challenges and obstacles.

The author includes a chart titled “Potential Disrupter + Character/Personality/Developmental Milestones Reached to this point = Either:
*Confrontation of the disrupter/working through, allowing for forward movement
*Mindlessness in light of the disrupter, causing a sort of spinning of the wheels
*Fight/flight/freeze causing a developmental arrest

The author, who remember is a clinical psychologist, writes, “The constant presence of digital devices introduces a third party into human relationships with our most basic selves and the “selves” of others.

The author concludes this chapter as follows:
“If the goal of living is to continually grow and mature, we must take a long look at our own development and how it is helped or hindered, The very core of ourselves to engage. Our minds, guts, and bodies are shaped by the narrow or broad realities to which we expose them. More than ever, we must do this work with the intention and by our act of will, or our trajectory will be narrow or limited. To avoid complacency, work through developmental arrests, and become healthy and whole, we must examine the nature of our journey, the ways in which we invest ourselves and our time, and the disrupters that influence both.

Remember that this author is a clinical psychologist. If you were in counseling or therapy, this is likely the manner in which she would explain the problem to you.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: