Posts Tagged ‘Aging Memory’

Sick Memory

November 5, 2016

The title of this post is the antithesis of the title of this blog.  There is a growing epidemic of sick memories.  No memory is highly preferable to sick memory.  There is an article titled “Trolls for Trump” by Andrew Marantz in the October 31, 2016 issue of the “New Yorker.”  The subtitle of the article is “How the alt-right spreads fringe ideas to the mainstream.”  The article details how this works and how dangerous it is.  Take Donald Trump and multiple him hundreds of thousands of times, perhaps even millions of times.
They can be found on the internet, the radio, and cable.  Unfortunately they affect legitimate news media.

Their content is based solely on beliefs, many of which are racist, misogynist, and move into facism, although not labeled as such.  There is virtually no evidence although some might be fabricated.  But rarely are there attempts to fabricate evidence.  As it all hinges on beliefs, and the more absolute, the more strongly expressed, the better.  They condemn what they call political correctness, which in other quarters is regarded as common decency.

They deny any evidence that contradicts their beliefs, much as Trump denies direct evidence that he did and said certain things.  Imaginary conspiracies rage that must be thwarted.  When frustrated or stymied, then the system is rigged, just at Trump has already condemned the election.  It is useful to note that Trump declared that the Republican nomination process was rigged, but he won.  So one might conclude that it was rigged in his favor.

There is no way to argue with these people or to debunk what they say.  Evidence is irrelevant in the alternative universe they have created.

Let me remind you how memory works.  Memory is a system for time travel.  We use it to consult the past to decide upon courses of action for the future.  We never have direct access to reality.  What we perceive has already happened and is stored in intermediate memory stages.  From this information we construct models of reality, which we use to guide our behavior.  As we learn we refine our models of the external world.  This is based on experience derived from external data.  In a way we are all scientists developing our models of the world based on our personal experience and what we find in transactive memory, which is information derived from our fellow humans and technology.

This lunatic fringe’s memories are sick because they just construct an artificial reality that is never checked against or modified by information from other sources.  The only thing of interest is more stuff that supports their beliefs.  There is no role for critical thinking and logic.  Hence these are sick memories, and these sick memories threaten our society and the progress of all societies.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Benefits of Physical Exercise & Cognitive Training on the Executive Function of Older Adults

February 22, 2015

As the name implies, executive function is important.  It involves the prefrontal cortex, which has a high level of neural plasticity (Miller, E.K., & Cohen, D.J. (2001),  “An Integrative Theory of Prefrontal Cortex Function,” Annual Review of Neuroscience, 24, 167-201. doi:10.1146/annurev.neuro.24.1.167), meaning that it is amenable to training.  This current blog post provides a very brief summary of an article by Justin E. Karr, Corson N. Areshenkoff, Phillipe Rast, and Mauricio A. Garcia-Barrera titled “An Empirical Comparison of the Therapeutic Benefits of Physical Exercise and Cognitive Training on the Executive Functions of Older Adults:  A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Trials” in Neuropsychology (2014), 829.845.

A meta-analysis is an analysis of a large body of research.  This one involved 46 studies, 23 involving physical exercise (PE), 21 cognitive training (CT), and 2 involving both.  Cognitive training did not work for individuals who were already cognitively impaired.  Otherwise, both types of training improved executive functions, but CT presented potential advantages for specific types of cognitive functions.  The immediately previous post discussed these executive functions:  working memory, inhibition, executive attention, problem solving, and fluency.  The review found that cognitive training on problem solving had the largest beneficial effect on the measure of Independent Activities of Daily Living (IADL).

Although the study found that the effects of cognitive training were larger than physical exercise, they qualified this conclusion.  I would contend that it is foolish to argue which is better.  They both provide benefit.  Presumably the major benefit from physical exercise is due to aerobic activity increasing oxygen flow to the brain.  I am curious as to whether any activity that increases respiration might be beneficial,  laughing for example.  Feel free to add whatever techniques you can think of for increasing respiration.  I think it would be worthwhile for researchers to explore possible benefits of these types of activities.  One of the primary advantages of cognitive training is that they can be targeted at specific cognitive functions.  Further research could be explored at designing training to improve specific functions where training is most needed.  The types of training might vary among individuals.  This meta-view has found that, general speaking, problem solving skills had the largest effect.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Five Constructs for Executive-Related Cognitive Abilities

February 18, 2015

This post addresses five constructs, or factors, dealing with executive related cognitive abilities.  They are obviously important because these are cognitive abilities at the executive level.  They also have special relevance for aging memory.  These factors play an important role in the assessment of Independent Activities of Daily Living (IADL).  IADL plays an important role in determining whether individuals are capable of living independently.  These factors are working memory, inhibition, executive at the attention, problem solving, and fluency.  Each factor will be briefly explained and discussed with respect to the healthy memory blog, “The Myth of Cognitive Decline.”

The most common example given of working memory is trying to remember a phone number you have just be given or read until it is dialed.  This is the magic number of 7 plus or minus two that has been revised down to five plus or minus two.  Actually, the size of the individual items affects the number that can be remembered.  Information must be rehearsed or actively used  or the information will be lost.  As the “Myth of Cognitive Decline” is addressing the phenomena of long term memory, working memory is not part of the myth.  Working memory does tend to decline as we age, although research has been done to demonstrate that it can be enhanced.

Inhibition refers to irrelevant information coming to mind when you are trying to remember or solve a problem.  This does increase as we age.  And it is the large amount of information held in long term memory that the “Myth of Cognitive Decline” addresses, that is likely increasing inhibition.  Simply put, there is more information to serve as the source of inhibition.  Given enough time, this inhibition can be overcome.

Executive attention refers to the managing and selection of information in trying to perform some task or to solve some problem.  The problem here for us as we age is that there is more information to attend to.  Again, given enough time, decreases in this ability can be overcome.

Problem solving refers to the marshaling of attention to solve  a problem.  Examples of problems addressed with IADL are planning a meal, planning a trip, managing finances, and so forth.  Although the more experienced mind has more information to solve problems, when there are time constraints, the additional information can be a problem as captured in the statement, “too much knowledge for one’s own good.”

Fluency is the ability to generate ideas or certain types of words (words beginning with “q”, vegetables, and so forth).  Here the older brain is at an advantage, but again, the pressures of time constraints can create problems.  A caveat to the “Myth f Cognitive Decline” is “given enough time.”

Recall, particularly of information from longer term memory, often involves problem solving.  When trying to remember the forgotten name of a particular actor for example, one might try to remember the movies the actor was in, the dates of the movies, and other actors.  Sometimes remembering a particular sound can help in the generation of candidate names.  What is interesting about these attempts is that the memory will suddenly pop into mind hours or days later.  Apparently memory search has been continuing in our non-conscious minds.  This is one of the reasons I think that these periodic memory searches contribute to memory health.  When we do these searches we are activating long unused memory circuits and reactivating them.  I have no carefully controlled research to back up my conjecture, but I think it is a compelling conjecture.  Perhaps some graduate student will undertake this research for a Master’s Degree or Ph.D.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.