Posts Tagged ‘Aleksandr Kogan’

How Facebook Let A Friend Pass My Data to Cambridge Analytica

April 24, 2018

The title of this post is identical to the title of a News & Technology piece by Timothy Revell in the 21 April 2018 issue of the New Scientist. This Is Your Digital Life (TIYDL) is the name of the Facebook App whose data ended up in the hands of Cambridge Analytica. Presumably only 270,000 people used the TIYDL app, but Facebook estimates that Cambridge Analytica ended up with data from 87 million people. These data were used by Cambridge Analytica to perform election shenanigans. The United Kingdom (UK) is gathering claimants to take Facebook to court for mishandling their data.

People who used the TIYDL app gave it permission to access the Facebook public profile page, date of birth and current city for each of their friends, along with the pages they liked. Facebook also says that “ a small number of people gave access to their own timeline and private messages, meaning that posts or messages from their friends would have been scooped up as well.

The TIDYL app was created by University of Cambridge professor Aleksandr Kogan to research how someone’s online presence corresponds to their personality traits. Kogan gave data from the app to Cambridge Analytics, which Facebook says was a violation of its terms of service. The UK’s information commissioner is also investigating whether it broke UK data protection laws. Data collected for research purposes can’t be given to a private company for a different use without consent. Kogan says that Facebook knew his intention was to pass it on and that it was written in the TIDYL app’s terms and conditions.

When reporters told Facebook about the situation in 2015, the firm said Cambridge Analytica had to delete the data. Cambridge Analytica said it did this, but whistle-blower Christopher Wylie said it didn’t.

Now Facebook is informing the people involved. It has released a tool that lets people check if their data were involved (bit.ly/2uXuHOY). The author used the tool and found, to his surprise, that a friend had used the app.

The problem is that to use virtually any software you need to agree to the terms of agreement, which include the privacy policies. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found in 2012 that it would take the average person 76 days to read all the privacy policies that they see each year. Clearly this is unreasonable.

Requirements should be made that these agreements be of reasonable length and understandable to the layperson. Moreover the default options should be “out” and action should be taken by the user to “opt in” This is necessary to be sure that people understand what they are doing.

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