Posts Tagged ‘Allen Francis’

Jesus Would Tell His Flock to Vote Righteously, Not Radical Right

February 10, 2018

The title of this post is identical to the title of a section in “Twilight of American Sanity: A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump” by Allen Francis, MD. This is one of the best sections in the book.

Francis begins, “And how does Trump measure up to Christ? ‘You shall not commit adultery, you shall not kill, you shall not steal, you shall not covet are summed in this single command: You must love your neighbor as yourself.’ Trump is a serial adulterer, a business thief, a tax cheat, and a greedy coveter of epic proportions. He brags about being above the law of both God and man in these most remarkable words: ‘I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose voters.’ Trump hasn’t directly killed anyone, but his attempt to deprive health care could kill millions and his promotion of global warming may wind up killing tens, or even hundreds, of millions.

So, how then could Trump win the evangelical vote by a surprisingly wide four-to-one margin and win the white Catholic vote by two-to-one? Dr. Francis writes,”This was no tribute to Trump’s religious purity—rather it was the work of cynical Christian leaders who had sold their souls to Trump in a shady backroom deal. They would influence tens of millions of religious voters to support him in exchange for his support for their hard-line positions against abortion and gay rights. The wheeling and dealing was remarkable testimony to the political skills, as well as religious hypocrisy, of many Christian leaders in the United States. Thirty pieces of silver never exchanged hands, but the teachings of Jesus Christ were surely cast by the wayside.

Jesus didn’t care a fig about abortion or homosexuality. In his time, abortion was legal and widely practiced—but he never once condemned it in all his many preachings. Homosexuality was also accepted and widely practiced—and again Jesus never once condemned it in all his many preachings. Jesus was the champion of the underdog against fat cats like Trump. Christ honored the humble and the weak: ‘Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are the meek, for they will inherit the earth.’ ‘For it is the one who is least among you all who is the greatest.’ He would never horse-trade the needs of the poor and the oppressed to further a ‘fundamentalist’ religious agenda and billionaire-inspired right-wing causes.’

Anyone who believes that Jesus could ever support a man like Trump needs lots more Bible study.”

Here is an explanation as to why Jesus didn’t care a fig about abortion. In his infinite wisdom he knew that the most important factor in the development of a healthy child into a healthy adult is that the child be wanted and loved by its mother. There is more than ample data regarding children who have not been loved and wanted by their mothers. One can be fairly confident that most unfortunate events caused by humans have been caused by humans who did not experience this necessary motherly love. If his followers behaved as he desired, they would love their children or place them in the hands of someone they were confident would provide this love. But biological life is irrelevant Souls are what is important here, not biological life. He knew that if a child were aborted that his Father would surely not forget the aborted child’s soul. That soul would be placed into a new life that would have a fortunate future.

HM has evangelical friends who did not vote for Trump and who find the support of any Christian for Donald Trump a profound embarrassment.

 

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How Could Trump Triumph — Part Three

February 8, 2018

The question posed in this post is identical to a chapter title in “Twilight of American Sanity: A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump” by Allen Francis, MD.
“Radical right-wing populism comes from the top. The John Birch Society was started in 1958 by twelve rich guys, including Fred Koch, the father of radical right-wing patrons Charles and David Koch. Its program was so kookily extreme that William F. Buckley Jr. denounced it as “far removed from common sense” and fought any role it had it might have in the Republican Party.” A previous healthy memory blog post titled “Why the Right Lost Its Mind” reviewed an important book by conservative Charles Sykes titled “How the Right Lost Its Mind” as to how the Republicans lost their minds and have been taken over by the Kochs and the Mercers. After the death of William F. Buckley, the radical right reemerged. Dr. Francis writes,”Today’s Republican platform, prejudices, and policies are derived almost plank for plank from the Bircher doctrine. The Koch brothers have been the most influential moving forces in turning extremist doctrine into mainstream Republican policy—and selling it to the common people it helps fleece. They (and their buddy billionaires) have spent tens of billions of dollars creating fake grassroots organizations, political think tanks, an army of political operatives at the state and local level, and training camps for conservative lawyers and judges. These enormous efforts promote science denial, tax breaks for the wealthy, deregulations, pollution, global warming, and minority bashing. Unholy alliances have been formed with the tobacco industry, the National Rifle Association, and extremist religious leaders. Fake populism’s biggest success story is the Koch-conceived, Koch funded Tea Party—which first conquered the Republican Party, then seized the White House.”

This group is expert at perverting populist ideology for their own, cynical and sinister, elitist ends—protecting their power and privilege by playing the “divide and conquer” game. Brilliant political propaganda skillfully co-opts the underclass it is screwing. The legitimate grievances of poor whites, who receive an ever-shrinking slice of the American economic pie, are redirected against blacks, Latinos, women, and immigrants. The elites keep their rich spoils (and their loopholes) by stoking inchoate fears and tribal feuds, and offering trickle-down crumbs. Attacks on “big government” protect the elite from the one institution that might umpire a fairer distribution of wealth. Radical right-wing demagoguery feeds upon and promotes all our social delusions—-using them as disguise for robbing the public purse.”

The John Birch Society was strongly anti-communist, anti-communist to the point where they left the bounds of reality. For example, they accused President Eisenhower of being a communist. So in addition to the efforts of William F. Buckley, they contributed to their own self destruction. What HM had been having difficulty understanding was why the right was bonding with Russia. It took a long time to realize that at that time the Soviet Union was a communist state. Former KGB agent Putin is no longer a communist. He has created a kleptocracy. Now a kleptocracy is something multi-billionaires craving even more wealth and power can cotton to. Their goal is to convert our American democracy into a kleptocracy. This explains why Republicans have no problems with Russia helping Trump get elected. And it explains why they are doing everything they can to either stop or discredit the special prosecutor. There is no relationship between today’s Republican Party and the truly Grand Old Party of the past. The Grand Old Party no longer exists. The Republican Party was sold out and bought. This realization explains a great deal.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

How Could a Trump Triumph? —- Part Two

February 7, 2018

The question posed in this post is identical to a chapter title in “Twilight of American Sanity: A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump” by Allen Francis, MD.

Many people were disturbed as to how an advanced country like Germany could be taken over by the Nazis. Theodor Adorno conducted a survey in the Unites States that revealed that many Americans also have the characteristics of what he called, “the Authoritarian Personality.” These characteristics include strongly defending conventions; being submissive to those above, and domineering to those below; devaluing intellectual activity; overvaluing power and toughness; blaming others; being cynical; and believing conspiracy theories and superstitions. People with this “Authoritarian Personality” obey, rally together and sometimes become powerful and dominating leaders. They respond aggressively to outsiders especially when they feel threatened. By acting tough, Trump displays his own (and plays to his followers) authoritarian inclinations.

It is clear that Trump’s base consists of people with this Authoritarian Personality. This was quite clear to his response to the demonstrators in Charlottesville. He said that there were good people demonstrating with the neo-nazis. He is reluctant to disavow support from the nazis and the Ku Klux Klan. And it is clear why. They constitute the majority of his solid base.

Trump is the ultimate confidence man. There’s the statement “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble, it’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.” Trump says our world is broken and that he and he alone can fix it. Francis writes, “But the transparency of Trump’s deceptions did not discourage his faithful followers from accepting that he is truthful and that the reporters he hates are the “most dishonest people on earth.”

“In a fearful and uncertain world, Trump is ever the clever confidence man, cynically trading on the overconfidence that is an inherent part of human psychology. He embodies within himself and unconsciously exploits in others, the “Dunning-Kruger effect.” There have been several healthy memory blog posts on the “Dunning-Kruger effect.” These Cornell psychologists have shown that people with less ability at any given task are more likely to overestimate their own skill and underestimate the skill of others. In effect people are massively ignorant of what they don’t know. They flaunt their ignorance and show contempt for the individuals who have expertise that the ignorant people need. If you don’t know what you don’t know, you can’t correct your ignorance. If you don’t know when you are making a mistake, you’ll keep making it. Francis quotes Shakespeare, “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man know himself to be a fool.”

It is next to impossible to campaign against this ignorance. There are ample contradictions in what Trump says himself to discredit him, but his supporters fail to notice these contradictions. And they have contempt for people with the relevant knowledge to deal with the problems we face.

Francis wrote “Trump understood that people who feel desperate, anxious, angry, and helpless are not in a mood to listen to rational arguments. His fear mongering pitch is that we are now living in the worst of worlds, in the worst of times; that there are even worse dangers ahead; that enemies lurk on all sides; and that we can trust him to keep us safe. He daily succeeds in passing off a fusillade of “alternative facts’ because frightened people are ready to accept them. Human irrationality in the face of stress has a long past and may, unfortunately, also enjoy a great future.”

“In the no-holds-barred U.S. political wars, bold untruth has become the most powerful of all political weapons. Ultraright-Wing talk radio, conspiracy theory internet sites, and Fox News spew forth a constant spate of alternative facts and extreme opinions that are often outright lies and always anything but ‘fair and balanced.’ They follow the chilling advice of Hitler’s propaganda minister, Joseph Goebbels: ‘It would not be impossible to prove, with sufficient repetition and a psychological understanding of the people concerned that a square is in fact a circle. They are mere words, and words can be molded until they clothe ideas in disguise.’”

How Could a Trump Triumph? — Part One

February 6, 2018

The question posed in this post is identical to a chapter title in “Twilight of American Sanity: A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump” by Allen Francis, MD. There needs to be multiple parts to this post.

Let’s begin with the campaign theme, “Make America Great Again.” The implicit assumption here is that America is no longer great. However, by all indications America was great having been brought back from an economic crisis by President Obama. When he became president, we were on the verge of a depression. He rescued us from that fate where all objective indicators indicated that the United States was already great again, if, indeed, it had ever fallen from greatness. The free nations of the world admired the United States and looked to it for leadership. However, dictatorial oligarchies like Russia, looked at the United States as a rival that needed to be defeated.

It is true that some people were unhappy. But HM would argue that in democracies, people are usually unhappy. This is true even when one’s favored party is in power. It is unlikely that they’re doing everything individuals want. There are also shortfalls due to the economy and what the government can deliver. HM has been unhappy his entire voting life regardless of which party was in power. All other advanced countries are way ahead of us with respect to medical care, many advanced countries offer less costly educational opportunities, and yet other advanced countries offer more freedoms. The term “American Exceptionalism” is frequently invoked to explain why we are different. HM argues that “Stupidity” can be readily and more accurately substituted for “Exceptionalism.”

It is true that since 1970 real wages in the United States have declined. When HM was in elementary school it was unusual for women with children to work. Now working spouses have become the norm. The question here is why have so many married women joined the workforce. Do they have to or do they want to? After all, there are still women who prefer to be full time mothers. But a very large number would be extremely unhappy if they were denied careers.

Middle-aged whites without a college degree (Trump’s most solid base) feel that a they are worse off then their parents. When they think that African-Americans and Latinos are somewhat better than they are, they become angry. So an ethnic factor exacerbates the problem. And, indeed, election time presents an opportunity to correct the situation. But it appears that whites who are not college educated do not widely read, if, indeed, they read at all. Otherwise, they would have realized that Trump’s solution was faulty. The loss of jobs was attributable primarily to automation. Other industries like coal were going out of fashion. Moreover, breaking trade agreements will likely have an adverse effect on the economy. So Trump will likely make the jobs problem worse, not better. Time will tell.

The preceding accounts were from the text. But more recent research questions the belief that job or income losses led to Trumpism. A 2016 study of 125,000 American adults by Gallup’s Pablo Diego-Rosell found that Trump voters had slightly higher incomes than others and were no more likely to be unemployed or exposed to competition from trade and immigration.

Terrorism is a factor exploited by Trump. Since 9/11, an average of only 9 people a year in the United States died from terrorist acts by radical Islamists; while each year more than 250,000 die from medical mistakes, 50,000 from drug overdoses, 37,000 from car accidents, and 33,000 from guns (not wielded by terrorists). Nevertheless, people are worried about terrorists. HM was in high school during the Cuban Missile Crisis. He remembers saying good-bye to his classmates at the end of a school day wondering, along with his classmates, whether we would ever see each other again. In those days, nuclear annihilation was a distinct possibility. At worst, terrorism is a minor nuisance. Even the detonation of a dirty bomb pales in comparison to nuclear annihilation. However, whenever people see a terrorist event on television, they feel threatened. Moreover, most mass killings are the result of the number of guns readily available, and not Islamists. Nevertheless, Trump capitalized greatly on these fears. He went beyond terrorists to immigrants in general.

The world is changing rapidly, and many people have difficulty coping with this change. It’s almost like stop the world, I want to get off. So the campaigning on the theme of “Making the World Great Again” promises a return to the quieter, good old days, if they, indeed, ever truly existed.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Hitler Trump Comparison

February 5, 2018

The following excerpt is taken from Chapter 5 of “Twilight of American Sanity: A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump” by Allen Francis, MD.

“Hitler, like Trump, never won a popular election—his best performance at the polls garnered only 44 % of the vote. Hitler, like Trump, had only the greatest contempt for democratic tradition, a free press, the courts, intellectuals, human rights. Hitler, like Trump, regarded truth as negotiable, lies as effective weapons, and morality as excess baggage. Hitler, like Trump, was a conspiracy theorist who surrounded himself with subservient “yes men,” unwilling or unable to challenge his misconceptions and misjudgments. Hitler, like Trump, was a world-class narcissist. Hitler like Trump, was despised and underestimated by the political establishment, who felt he could be used and manipulated to their own purposes. Hitler, like Trump, defied the political establishment and remained true (only) to himself. Hitler, like Trump, felt disrespected and treated unfairly, and had many scores to settle. Hitler, like Trump, claimed infallibility, that he was smarter than his generals and advisors, and that his gut instincts were the nation’s best guide. Hitler, like Trump, exploited the fear, anger, and resentments of his people. Hitler, like Trump, promoted tribalism and reviled minorities as dangerous vermin.”

At this point readers are likely thinking that Dr. Francis is being unfair. Surely Hitler was unlike Trump in some ways. Dr Francis obliges, “For sure, Hitler was unlike Trump in some ways. He was much smarter, better read, more mature, better organized, less ignorant of history, more self-disciplined, less distractible, better mannered, more plausible—and, so far, much more bloodthirsty, ruthless, and deadly.”

Twilight of American Sanity

February 4, 2018

The title of this post is identical to the title of an important book by Allen Francis, MD. The subtitle is “A Psychiatrist Analyzes the Age of Trump.” The book begins with the following epigraphs:

The iniquity of the fathers will be visited on the children and the children’s children, to the third and fourth generation.
———EXODUS

As democracy is perfected, the office of the president represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart’s desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron.
——— H. L. MENCKEN

A human being is a part of the whole, called by us “universe,” a part limited in time and space. He experiences himself, his thoughts and feelings as something separated from the rest, a kind of optical delusion of his consciousness. This delusion is a kind of prison for us, restricting us to our personal desires and to affection for a few persons nearest to us. Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty.
———ALBERT EINSTEIN

The title of the Prologue
Trump Isn’t Crazy, We Are

followed by this quote from FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE
Insanity in individuals is somewhat rare. But in groups, parties, nations, and epochs, it is the rule.

Dr. Francis holds the distinction for being the author of the criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder. He writes, “Trump’s amateur diagnosticians have all made the same fundamental error. They correctly note that the disorder’s defining features fit him like a glove (grandiose self-importance; preoccupations with being great; feeling special; having to hang out with special people; requiring constant admiration; feeling entitled lacking empathy; and being exploitative, envious, and arrogant.) But they fail to recognize that being a world-class narcissist doesn’t make Trump mentally ill. Crucial to the diagnosis of Narcissistic Personality Disorder is the requirement that the behaviors cause clinically significant distress or impairment.” But Dr. Francis does concede that Trump is a bad person. Psychiatrists do have this requirement that the individual must be personally suffering distress to have a diagnosis of mental illness. By doing this, psychiatrists are making their job much easier. Unless a personal realizes they have a problem, the chances of treating it are remote. So to have the symptoms of Narcissistic Personality Disorder, but not being diagnosed as being mentally ill is actually worse, as there is virtually no hope of this individual being successfully treated for this disorder.

Dr. Francis goes on to state that there are three harmful unintended consequences of using psychiatric tools to discredit Trump. “First, lumping him with the mentally ill stigmatizes them more than it embarrasses him. Most mentally ill people are well behaved and well meaning, both of which Trump is decidedly not. Second, medicalizing Trump’s bad behavior underestimates him and distracts attention from the dangers of his policies. Trump is a political problem, not one for psychoanalysis. Instead of focusing on Trump’s motivations, we must counter his behaviors with political tools. And, third, were Trump to be removed from office, his successors (Pence and Ryan) would probably be much worse—more plausible purveyors of his very dangerous policies.” Although what Dr. Francis writes is true of domestic policies, he does not adequately consider the risks Trump presents with respect to foreign policies, control of the military and the nuclear football.

Dr. Francis continues, “But what does it say about us, the we elected someone so manifestly unfit and unprepared to determine mankind’s future? Trump is a symptom of a world in distress, not its sole cause. Blaming him for all our troubles misses the deeper, underlying societal sickness that made possible his unlikely ascent. Calling Trump crazy allows us to avoid confronting the craziness in our society—-if we want to get sane, we must first gain insight about ourselves. Simply put, Trump isn’t crazy, but our society is.”

More posts on this important book will directly follow.