Posts Tagged ‘diet’

How to Develop a Healthy Memory

December 22, 2015

I get the sense that many who read the healthy memory blog are disappointed that advice is not provided on exactly what to do for a healthy memory.   If a vaccine to either prevent or cure Alzheimer’s and dementia is not in the offing, what specifically should they do.  Is there a diet that will save them?  Will physical exercise suffice, and if so, how much?  What online games do they need to play or what specific cognitive exercises need to be done and for how long?

Hints to some of these question can be found, but no definitive answers.  The reason that no definitive answers can be found is that there are no definitive answers.  The two big themes of this blog are to develop growth mindsets and to practice meditation.  Although diet and physical exercise do play a role, growth mindsets and meditation are key in my view.  The healthy memory blog presents many ideas as to how to pursue growth mindsets and meditation, as well as posts that are provided to help one think about different ideas.

No guarantees can be provided that dementia cannot be prevented.  But I strongly believe that not only reading, but pursuing some of the ideas in the healthy memory blog will greatly reduce one’s risks.  They also provide some guidance on leading a more satisfactory life.  Accordingly, the healthy memory blog should be of interest to people of all ages.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Benefits of Diet and Nutrition on Nurturing the Older Brain and Mind

June 8, 2014

This post draws heavily on the chapter on the benefits of diet and nutrition in Nurturing the Older Brain and Mind by Greenwood  and Parasuraman.  They do not conclude that there are no benefits of diet and nutrition on cognition.  Rather they are concluding that most evidence for this claim is weak.

Now there is strong evidence that dietary restriction with respect to calories consumed does confer significant benefits for cardiovascular health, but there is no strong evidence for its benefits on cognition.  We often read that what is good for the heart is good for the brain and cognition, but that is not necessarily so.  Consumption of foods containing reservaterol may confer benefits on healthy and cognition that are similar to dietary restriction.  Greenwood and Parasuraman are hesitant to make this recommendation due to the dangers of alcohol abuse.  Here your healthy memory blog post author will say that along as alcohol is not abused, there are benefits.  Indeed, moderate alcohol consumption, one or two drinks per day, has been found to have benefits on health in general.

Goodman and Parasuraman also note that the substitution of polyunsaturated fatty acids for saturated fat in the diet has convincing evidence for the human risk of heart disease, but the evidence for beneficial effects on human cognition is inconclusive.

Goodman and Parasumanan state that there is little evidence that B-vitamin supplementation has any beneficial efftext on the brain or cognition.

Well-controlled studies of the effects of specific foods, spices, herbs, and micronutients are few in number and the results are inconclusive, but there is some evidence for the benefits of antioxidants in the diet consistent with other evidence for a ole of oxidative stress in negative effects on aging.

The Benefits of Diet and Nutrition on Nurturing the Older Brain and Mind

This post draws heavily on the chapter on the benefits of diet and nutrition in Nurturing the Older Brain and Mind by Greenwood  and Parasuraman.  They do not conclude that there are no benefits of diet and nutrition on cognition.  Rather they are concluding that most evidence for this claim is weak.

Now there is strong evidence that dietary restriction with respect to calories consumed does confer significant benefits for cardiovascular health, but there is no strong evidence for its benefits on cognition.  We often read that what is good for the heart is good for the brain and cognition, but that is not necessarily so.  Consumption of foods containing reservaterol may confer benefits on healthy and cognition that are similar to dietary restriction.  Greenwood and Parasuraman are hesitant to make this recommendation due to the dangers of alcohol abuse.  Here your healthy memory blog post author will say that along as alcohol is not abused, there are benefits.  Indeed, moderate alcohol consumption, one or two drinks per day, has been found to have benefits on health in general.

Goodman and Parasuraman also note that the substitution of polyunsaturated fatty acids for saturated fat in the diet has convincing evidence for the human risk of heart disease, but the evidence for beneficial effects on human cognition is inconclusive.

Goodman and Parasumanan state that there is little evidence that B-vitamin supplementation has any beneficial efftext on the brain or cognition.

Well-controlled studies of the effects of specific foods, spices, herbs, and micronutients are few in number and the results are inconclusive, but there is some evidence for the benefits of antioxidants in the diet consistent with other evidence for a ole of oxidative stress in negative effects on aging.

Using Our Minds to Control Our Eating

March 9, 2013

Obesity is a worldwide problem now, and dieting is a personal problem for many of us. It appears that both evolution and the food industry has conspired to make us desire fattening foods. Consequently, dieting is difficult. Are there any good techniques for controlling our eating? The answer is, yes. One of these techniques is our mind. Mindfulness can help us control our eating.

An experiment1 investigated whether eating lunch mindfully, in contrast to eating with distractions or no particular focus, reduced later snack intake. Twenty-nine female undergraduates either ate a fixed lunch while (1) focusing on the sensory characteristics of the food as they ate (food focus group), (2) reading a newspaper article about food (food thoughts control group), or (3) in the absence of any secondary task (neutral control group). Later in the afternoon cookie intake was measured as well as rated vividness of memory for lunch. Participants in the food focus group ate significantly fewer cookies that participants in both the food thoughts control group or the neutral control group. Rated appetite before the snack session was lower in the food focus group than in the other two groups. Their rated vividness of their memory of lunch was higher in the food focus group. The rated vividness of lunch memory was negatively correlated with snack intake.

This study strongly suggests that memory plays an important role in appetite control. Paying attention to food while eating enhances this meal memory.

So to control our appetites we should not eat while we are either watching television or reading. Moreover, if we concentrate on the meal and the enjoyment of the meal, our subsequent hunger and desire for snacks will lessen. Conversation remains an open issue. Conversation typically slows down our consumption of food, but if it takes our minds off what we are eating, it might be problematic. Perhaps its best to work comments about the meal into our conversations.

1Higgs, S., & Donohoe, J.E. (2011). Focusing on food during lunch enhances lunch memory and decreases later snack intake. Appetite, Aug57(1):202-6. Doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2011.04.016. Epib2011 May4.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2012. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.