Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Benson’

The Brain and Mindfulness Meditation

April 2, 2018

The title of this post is identical to the title of an article by Bruce Lieberman in the Health & Science section of the 27 March 2018 issue of the Washington Post. His article was based on a recent article in the APS journal Perspectives on Psychological Science (Jan 2018) titled “Mind the Hype: A Critical Evaluation and Prescriptive Agenda for Research and Mindfulness and Meditation.” The title should tip off the reader that this article has a bias and it does. Healthymemory blog readers should be aware that there have been many posts on this topic.

The references include only three citations of Davidson, the most prolific and qualified researcher in the area, and only one for Goleman, who provided the incentive for research in this area. There is no reference to Dr. Benson, a physician and researcher at Harvard medical school who documented the benefits of the relaxation response. He also provided guidance and benefits of the relaxation response on Angina Pectoris, Anxiety, Depression, Hypertension, Stress-related infertility, insomnia, Menopausal, Perimenopausal, and Breast Cancer Hot Flashes, Nausea, Pain-General, Pain-Variations, Parkinson’s Disease, Phobias, Premature Aging, Premature Ventricular Contractions and Palpitations, and premenstrual syndrome. He does advise for treatment with a physician, but if the physician is hostile to meditation, then to look for a more accommodating physician. He also documents epigenetic effects in which meditation fosters healthy readouts from one’s genes. These effects are described in the healthy memory blog post “The Genetic Breakthrough—Your Ultimate Mind-Body Connection.”

HM was amazed by the kind and generous response by Dr. Davidson to the “Mind the Hype” article in his following paper in the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science, (Jan 2018) “Outstanding Challenges in Scientific Research on Mindfulness and Meditation.” Dr. Davidson is one of the most conscientious and demanding scientists HM knows.

The “Mind the Hype” article does not cite the book by Goleman and Davidson titled, “Altered Traits: Science Reveals How Meditation Changes Your Mind, Brain, and Body.”
This is the most exhaustive review of the literature currently available, and it does indicate how much is known about each topic. Dr. Davidson is his own most severe critic. So the best way to learn about the benefits and current limitations of mindfulness and meditation is to read this book. Short of that, read the numerous healthymemory posts that have been based on this book, along with the other healthy memory blog posts on this topic. Just use the search block for this blog. You can also go to Dr. Davidson’s website, https://centerhealthyminds.org/about/founder-richard-davidson

HM’s concern is that this article in the Washington Post based on this “Mind the Hype” review in the Washington Post will discourage people from meditating, in general, and from trying the relaxation response, in particular. There is much to be gained here and it is difficult imaging any risk.

Go to the healthy memory blog “An Update of the Relaxation Response Update” for guidance on how to do the relaxation response.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Two Step Process

November 6, 2015

Dr. Benson has been conducting research with the Dalai Lama since 1979.  The Dalai Lamai  is very much interested in science and engineering.  If it were not for his position as His Holiness for Tibetan  Monks, he says that he would have preferred to become an engineer.

Tibetan monks have taken the potential of meditation to the extreme.  In one study monks dressed in nothing but small loincloths are draped in wet sheets while exposed to near-freezing temperatures.  Because these monks had developed amazing physiological control over years of practicing this type of heat-producing meditation, they experienced no distress in these conditions.  Within minutes the body temperatures they produced steamed and dried the wet, cold sheets.

Of course, these results were not obtained by the monks meditating for 20 minutes twice a day.  Meditation for many hours over many years is needed to obtain these results.  But they do demonstrate the control the mind can have over the body.

Usually a precaution is given that motivation should not be involved when meditating.  That is, no goals are to be achieved.  Noting this and noting the performance of these Tibetan Monks Dr. Benson developed the two-step process.  First the Relaxation Response is invoked.  Then, when the mind is quiet, when focusing has opened a door to your mind, visualize an outcome that is meaningful.  If you want to eliminate a pain, envision yourself without the pain.  If you want t improve your performance in a particular venue, imagine yourself performing well in these venues.  According to Dr. Benson, “Whatever your goal, these two steps can be powerful, allowing anyone to reap  the benefits of the Relaxation Response and take advantage of a quiet mind to rewire thoughts and actions in desired directions.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2015. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

The Relaxation Response Update

October 31, 2015

There was an earlier (2009) healthy memory blog post titled “The Relaxation Response.  The first book on the relaxation response was published in 1975.  A  25th anniversary of the publication of the first book was published with the same title by Herbert Benson, M.D. with Mirian K. Zipper.  Back in 1975 it was revolutionary to believe that the mind played a role in practical medicine.  The book was an instant hit and started inroads into the role of the mind in practical medicine.  By 2015 mindfulness loomed large.

I believe that the relaxation response is the easiest of all meditation techniques.  It is based on Transcendental Meditation, although the secret meditation word provided to TM initiates is not provided.  Everyone can provide their own word or object.

The relaxation response can be invoked with any of a number of techniques:  yoga or qiqong, walking or swimming, even knitting or rowing.  Prayer and religious meditative practices also work.  Although meditation and mindfulness are usually thought of in the context of Buddhism and Hinduism, it has also been central to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.  The book provides many examples of how meditation was used to known practitioners throughout these religions.

According to Dr. Benson, “Here is a list of conditions that, to the extent caused or affected by mind/body connections  (such as stress and the fight-or-flight response), can be significantly improved or even cured when self-care techniques are employed:
angina pectoris
cardiac arryhythmias
allergic skin reactions
anxiety
bronchial asthma
herpes simplex (cold sores)
cough
constipation
diabetes mellitus
duodenal ulcers
dizziness
fatigue
hypertension
infertility
insomnia
nausea and vomiting during pregnancy
nervousness
all forms of pain—backaches, headaches, abdominal pain, muscle pain, joint aches, postoperative pain, neck, arm, and leg pain
postoperative swelling
premenstrual syndrome
rheumatoid arthritis,
side effects of cancer
side effects of aids
Being a physician, Dr. Benson is careful to caution against self-treatment, advising that self-treatment be undertaken under the care of a physician.  Should your physician find these techniques objectionable, I would advise finding another physician who has successfully made way into the 21st Century.

Techniques for inducing the relaxation response were provided in the original healthy memory post.  Here is a set of updated instructions:
Pick a focus word, short phrase, or prayer that is firmly rooted in your belief system.
Sit quietly in a comfortable position.
Close your eyes.
Relax your muscles, progressing from your feet to your calves, thighs, abdomen, shoulders, head, and neck.
Breather slowly and naturally, and as you do, say your focus word, sound, phrase, or prayer silently to yourself as you exhale.
Assume a passive attitude.  don’t worry about how well you’re doing.  When other thoughts come to mind, simply say to yourself, “Oh well,” and gently return to your repetition.
Continue for ten to twenty minutes.
Do not stand immediately.  Continue sitting quietly for a minute or so, allowing other thoughts to return.  Then open your eyes and sit for another minute before rising.
Practice the technique once or twice daily.  Good times to do so are before breakfast and after dinner.
He advises against doing meditation right after eating.  Apparently digestive processes interfere with meditative processes.

This list can be regarded as the ideal.  Dr. Benson notes that the Relaxation Response can also be elicited while exercising.  He writes that if you are jogging or walking to pay attention to the cadence of our feet on the ground—“left, right, left right”—and when other thoughts come into our minds, say “Oh, well,” and return to “left, right, left right.  Swimmers can pay attention to the tempo of their strokes, cyclists to the whir of the wheels,  dancers to the best of the music, others to the rhythm of their breathing.

In a subsequent post I’ll provide my own personal observations on meditating.