Posts Tagged ‘emotionally hijacked state’

Filter Bubbles

April 1, 2019

This is the fiftth post based on an important book by Roger McNamee titled “Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe.” Adults get locked into filter bubbles. Wikipedia defines filter bubbles as “a state of intellectual isolation that can result from personalized searches when a website algorithm selectively guesses what information a user would like to see based on information about the users, such as location, past click-behavior and search history.

Filter bubbles are not unique to internet platforms. They can also be found on any journalistic medium that reinforces preexisting beliefs of its audience, while surprising any stories that might contradict them, such as Fox News, In the context of Facebook, filter bubbles have several elements. In Facebook’s endless pursuit of engagement, Facebook’s AI and algorithms feed users a steady diet of content similar to what has engaged us most in the past. Usually that is content that we “like.” Each click, share, and comment helps Facebook refine its AI. With 2.2 billion people clicking, sharing, and commenting every month—1.47 billion every day—Facebook’s AI knows more about users than the users can possibly imagine. All that data in one place is a target for bad actors, even if it were well-protected. But Roger writes that Facebook’s business model is to give the opportunity to exploit that data to just about anyone who is willing to pay for the privilege.

One can make the case that these platforms compete in a race to the bottom of the brain stem—where AIs present content that appeals to the low-level emotions of the lizard brain, such things as immediate rewards, outrage, and fear. Roger writes, “Short videos perform better than longer ones. Animated GIFs work better than static photos. Sensational headlines work better than calm descriptions of events. Although the space of true things is fixed, the space of falsehoods can expand freely in any direction. False outcompetes true. Inflammatory posts work better at reaching large audiences within Facebook and other platforms.”

Roger continues, “Getting a user outraged, anxious, or afraid is a powerful way to increase engagement. Anxious and fearful users check the site more frequently. Outraged users start more content to let other people know what they should also be outraged about. Best of all from Facebook’s perspective, outraged or fearful users in an emotionally hijacked state become more reactive to further emotionally charge content. It is easy to imagine how inflammatory content would accelerate the heart rate and trigger dopamine hits. Facebook knows so much about each user that they can often tune News Feed to promote emotional responses. They cannot do this all the time for every user, but they do it far more than users realize. And they do it subtly in very small increments. On a platform like Facebook, where most users check the site every day small nudges over long periods of time can eventually produce big changes.”