Posts Tagged ‘figure skating’

the evolving self

December 11, 2019

the evolving self is a new book by mihaly csikszentmihalyi. He’ll be referred to in this post as mc. The subtitle is “a psychology for the new millennium.” mc sets a high goal for himself. He sees it critical for the evolving self to evolve to overcome the forces of entropy. Indeed this is an extraordinary objective to achieve.

As a scholarly work, the evolving self is impressive. He reviews the worlds of genes, culture, and the self. He discusses predators and parasites, and the competition between memes and genes. HM learned much in reading this book. While reading he was thinking that an enormous number of posts would be required to capture the meaning of this book. But he came to the conclusion that this work is seriously flawed, and that it would be a mistake to have readers reading these posts. Still, if you find this topic interesting, read the book.

Key to everything mc writes is the concept of flow. Flow is what one experiences when a skill or train of thought is proceeding well. Indeed, flow is a most enjoyable experience. The problem is that mc seems to regard flow as an end in itself. To the best of HM’s experience, mc never discusses what happens when flow ceases or is disrupted. Presumably this is something that most of us have experienced. And it is an experience that can readily be viewed on television. Watch the performance of a figure skater who is obviously experiencing flow in a beautiful, flawless experience. Then she suddenly falls splat onto the ice. Or the professional golfer who is hitting birdies and eagles on consecutive holes. Then suddenly, his game deteriorates. Double bogies and sand traps become the rule. These sudden cessations in flow are most unpleasant.

mc sets the seeking of flow as goal in itself. But this could be quite harmful. The easier the task, the easier it is to achieve flow. Seeking flow itself could lead one to become addicted to such tasks, in effect becoming addicted to flow.

More difficult tasks and bodies of knowledge require extensive periods of learning which can be quite frustrating. Using the lingo of this blog, flow is a System 1 process. System 2 processing, more commonly known as thinking, requires the expenditure of mental effort.

Our personal development requires extensive System 2 processing. There are times when this becomes easy and flow is achieved. But this is not the end in itself. Indeed, it signals that the time has come to advance and to take on more difficulty.

This is what is advocated by this blog. Growth mindsets and continuous growth of these mindsets throughout one’s life. This results in a more fulfilling life and in the decrease in the likelihood of falling prey to Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Growth mindsets benefit not only the individual, but society as a whole. The advancements of science and technology require growth mindsets.

Moreover, one’s goals should not be on the acquisition of wealth and possessions. We must all feel responsible for all our fellow humans and for the development and advancement of society as a whole.

It is astonishing that despite all mc’s knowledge, there remains an enormous lacuna This gap is meditation. There have been many posts about meditation in the HM blog. There are more than 100 posts on this topic (search for meditation in the blog’s search box which is found at https://healthymemory.wordpress.com/?s=meditation.

Meditation is central because it helps us develop our powers of attention, which are central to cognitive achievement. Meditation can also lead to appreciation for and love of our fellow humans.

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.