Posts Tagged ‘Omar Hammami’

CRIME

December 14, 2019

This post is based on Messing with the Enemy an excellent book by Clint Watts. CRIME is an acronym used by Watts to describe the motivations and enticements an intelligence officer or law enforcement investigator uses to recruit an agent overseas or a street informant in America (Watts notes that the CIA uses the acronym MICE). They’re the reasons why people turn, or flip, when they begin reporting on a group they once declared allegiance to or betray an ally on behalf of their foe. C stands for compromise. Compromised people can be coerced into doing something they might not normally consider. A criminal charge, an outstanding arrest warrant, unpaid debts, a sick loved one who needs surgery—all provide avenues for convincing a person to provide assistance. He adds R for revenge. Watts writes, “Think Mandy Patinkin in The Princess Bride”: ‘My name is Inigo Montoya. You killed my father. Prepare to die.’ There may not be any other motivation that makes people as relentless in its pursuit. The unjust murder of a loved one, wrongful treatment of others, perceived injustice by a rival: revenge once pursued, usually can be countered only by death. Ideology constitutes the I and represents the purest motivation for any action. Those driven by ideology always prove the hardest to flip and most difficult to stop. M should indeed be bold: money. It’s the most common reason for betrayal and the flimsiest. Those incentivized by cash prove to be the easiest to recruit, and most likely to deceive or switch teams. Finally, the E is for ego. Fame and glory, the desire to be a hero, makes men do strange things, Empower and embrace the ego of a narcissist and he’ll be a cost-effective asset, a turncoat for good or evil, depending on the suitor.”

Not all terrorists communicate in Arabic. English is also used, which is useful for recruiting in the United States and other English speaking countries. Omar Hammami is an interesting terrorist. He was born and lived in the United States. But he moved to the Arab world and set himself up to be not only a terrorist, but also a leader of terrorists. Watts engaged Hammami. He did a quick assessment of Hammami’s motivations that were revealed so much on twitter. “The most obvious motivation for his endless disclosures was compromise. The more Omar got his story into the public regarding al-Shabaab (another terrorist) hunting him, the more likely he’d be able to survive, gain protectors, and push Shabaab into a no-win situation. If the terrorists killed Hammami, they’d hurt their brand in the eyes of future recruits and international supporters. Furthermore, each Shabaab attempt to hunt Hammami and quell his supporters increased Omar’s revenge response. A war inside was what I (Watts) wanted. I’d (Watts) amplify any of Omar’s resentments and accentuate his quest for revenge.”

Watts continues,”More subtle but still immediately apparent were Omar’s egoistical motivations. Hammami loved attention—loved it. He thought of himself as a future jihadi visionary and consistently sought to showcase his theological expertise, and pined for the attention of senior jihidas and well-known terrorist experts. Omar wanted to be famous, and I’d (Watts) help him do that. In so doing, I’d (Watts) undermine motivations others might have for heading of to Somalia and joining al-Shabaab.”

Continuing further, “There were also topics I wanted to avoid when chatting with Omar. Hammami wanted to be an ideological expert, and he’d spent time studying and pontificating, developing his own vision for the future of global jihad. As a non-Muslim lacking any theological expertise, I (Watts) risked empowering Omar by engaging in his religious rants and raising his profile among his supporters. I (Watts) wouldn’t be able to convince him that he was wrong about his religion, and I (Watts) stood to look quite stupid if I (Watts) tried and failed. A second area I (Watts) sought was to avoid was money, specifically his financial situation. He had left America to join terrorists in one of the most impoverished countries in the world. Sitting in prosperous America, I (Watts) didn’t want to glorify his financial sacrifice.”

Continuing still further, “I (Watts) took the three motivations I (Watts) wanted to amplify and then identified common ground I could make with Hammami for rapport building, He wanted to talk with me (Watts)—that was obvious—but I (Watts) didn’t want to speak with him strictly regarding terrorism. One heated debate would end our engagements. Persuading him to divulge more information or discuss his positions would mean first getting him to feel a deeper connection.”

“RPMs” is a discussion technique used to nudge guilty people toward a confession. R stands for rationalize so Watts would justify some of Hammami’s actions. P stands for projection in which he would saddle up to Omar’s position and take his side. M stands for minimize, minimize his actions which was difficult as he had killed people.

To cut to the end of this story, Omar Hammami never returned to the United States. Twelve years and a day after the September 11 terrorist attacks, al-Shabbab hunted him down in the forests of Somalia and killed him.