Posts Tagged ‘Pierre Herigone’

More on Remembering Numbers

November 27, 2009

Developing a facility in remembering numbers is central to most advanced mnemonic techniques. The blog, “Remembering Numbers” presented the technique developed by the French mathematician and astronomer, Pierre Herigone (1580-1643). His system recodes numbers into sounds, which then can be recoded into words and images that are much more memorable than numbers. Remember that it is the sounds the letters represent rather than the letters themselves that are used for recoding.

1                    t or d sound

2                    n sound

3                    m sound

4                    r sound

5                    l sound

6                    sh or ch sound

7                    hard c, g, or k sound

8                    f or v sound

9                    p or b sound

0                    s sound      

The blog, “Remembering Numbers”, used this technique to provide an alternative to the one-bun rhyme mnemonic technique (see the blog, “The One Bun Rhyme Mnemonic”). Here are 100 more pegwords developed using this technique.

  1. Dye
  2. kNee
  3. hoMe
  4. haiR
  5. Lye
  6. CHow
  7. Key
  8. hooF
  9. Bow
  10. DiCe
  11. ToT
  12. TuNe
  13. ToMb
  14. TiRe
  15. ToweL
  16. DiSH
  17. TacK
  18. DoVe
  19. TuB
  20. NoSe
  21. kNoT
  22. NuN
  23. gNoMe
  24. hoNoR
  25. NaiL
  26. kNotCH
  27. NecK
  28. kNiFe
  29. kNoB
  30. MouSe
  31. MaT
  32. MaN
  33. MuMMy
  34. MaRe
  35. MaiL
  36. MuSH
  37. MuG
  38. MoVie
  39. MaP
  40. RoSe
  41. RaT
  42. RaiN
  43. RooM
  44. RoweR
  45. RaiL
  46. RiCH
  47. RaCK
  48. RooF
  49. RoPe
  50. LouSe
  51. LoT
  52. LaNe
  53. LaMb
  54. LuRe
  55. LuLu
  56. LuSH
  57. LaKe
  58. LoVe
  59. LaP
  60. ShoeS
  61. SHoT
  62. SHiN
  63. SHaMe
  64. SHaRe
  65. JaiL
  66. JudGe
  67. JoKe
  68. CHieF
  69. SHiP
  70. CaSe
  71. CoT
  72. CaN
  73. CoMb
  74. CaR
  75. CoaL
  76. CaSH
  77. CooK
  78. CaVe
  79. CaPe
  80. VaSe
  81. FooT
  82. FaN
  83. FaMe
  84. FiRe
  85. FooL
  86. FiSH
  87. FoG
  88. FiFe
  89. FoP
  90. BooZe
  91. BaT
  92. PaNe
  93. BoMb
  94. BeeR
  95. PooL
  96. BuSH
  97. BooK
  98. BeeF
  99. PoPe
  100. DooZies

 So you know have 100 peg words for memorizing lists of up to 100 items. If you do not like these peg words, you can make up your own. I hope from the examples provided that it is clear how the consonant sound system works.

Once you have learned your pegwords, you can use them to memorize anything you want to know or anyone you may want to impress. You could learn the names of the seven dwarfs, the 44 Presidents of the United State, the fifty states of the union according to their entry as a state, or the winners of the Super Bowl by Super Bowl # by forming an image between the numeric peg and the item to be remembered. Abstract items might require some recoding (See the blog “How to Memorize Abstract Information.”).

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Remembering Numbers

November 21, 2009

Numbers are among the most difficult items to remember. Psychologists at Carnegie-Mellon University conducted a study[1] in which, after more than 230 hours of practice, a student increased his memory span from 7 to 79 digits. The study concluded that there was no limit to memory performance with practice. This conclusion is significant as the common wisdom was that memory span could not be increased. The student used an interesting technique for increasing his memory span. If you have been following this blog, you should know by now that one of the keys to effective remembering is to make material more meaningful. This individual was a runner who maintained a key interest in running times. He knew the records and what were good and poor running times for any distance you could name. He recoded the number he was to remember in terms of running times. It took practice (more than 230 hours worth) to expand his memory span from 7 to 79 digits, but he did it by recoding the series of numbers into running times and then decoded them back for recall.

In the memory span experiment one number is presented every second. So strong demands are placed on short term memory   The record for reciting the irrational number (one with a never ending series of decimals) pi (the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter) is, at the time of this writing, 10,000 decimal places.  This is likely to become longer as this seems to be a popular record to break. People trying to break this record can study and practice as long as they like. The must, however, recite the entire number correctly from memory.

Remembering numbers is the topic. There is no expectation, however, that you know anything at all about running times. This blog covers some more conventional techniques for remember numbers. The material in this blog is central to most advanced memory techniques. Please give it your detailed attention. If you find this difficult, please be patient and persevere.

The basic idea is to have a system of sounds to recode the numbers. Pierre Herigone (1580-1643), a French mathematician and astronomer, devised a system for recoding numbers into letters by using sounds. These sounds can be made into words and images that are much more memorable. Remember that it is the sounds the letters represent rather than the letters themselves that are used for recoding.

1                    t or d sound

2                    n sound

3                    m sound

4                    r sound

5                    l sound

6                    sh or ch sound

7                    hard c, g, or k sound

8                    f or v sound

9                    p or b sound

0                    s sound     

 So here are some mnemonic pegwords to replace the one- bun rhyme mnemonic peg words presented in One Bun Rhyme Mnemonic blog.

1                    Tie

2                    Noah

3                    Ma

4                    Rye

5                    Law

6                    SHoe

7.                    Cow

8.                    iVy

9.                    Bee

10.                 ToeS


[1] Ericsson, K.A., Chase, W.G., and Faloon, S.  (1980).  Acquisition of a memory skill,  Science, 208(4448), 1181-1182.

 

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2009. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.