Posts Tagged ‘superficial understanding’

Typical Forgetting

September 16, 2019

This post is based on an important book by Scott D. Slotnick titled “Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory.” Remember to consult the website http://www.brainfacts.org/
to see the anatomical information referred to in this post.

Usually forgetting in everyday life can be attributed to a failure to attend to information. One might not be interested in the material, distracted by a cell phone, been sleepy, or thinking about something else. Attention is key to remembering and not forgetting. If participants are asked to deeply process words, such as deciding whether each word in a study list is “pleasant” or “unpleasant,” their memory performance will be similar whether or not they knew there is a subsequent memory test. Successfully encoding information requires attention rather than the knowledge that the information will be tested at a later time.

The pattern of brain activity associated with subsequent forgetting is the same as the pattern of brain activity that is referred to as the default network. The default network consists of the regions of the brain that become active when participants are not engaged in any particular task, such as when they lay quietly with their eyes closed, passively looking at a fixation point on the screen, or waiting between experimental trials. This network of brain activity has been associated with many cognitive states, such as daydreaming, mind wandering, lapses of attention, and retrieval of personal information.

So in the real world one knows to minimize distractions and attend to information that is important. To avoid forgetting, one needs to focus attention and stay engaged. So minimize multitasking. Staying constantly plugged in guarantees superficial understanding.