Posts Tagged ‘The Lancet’

Homo Sapiens

January 3, 2020

As the immediately preceding post said “Too many humans are not living up to the name of their species” readers might have drawn the conclusion that these humans are all Republicans. The objective of this post is to correct this possible misconception. First of all, not all Republicans are guilty, there remain a few Republicans who hold fast to their true Republican beliefs. The husband, if he is still the husband, of Kellyanne Conway is one of these individuals, who is both extremely intelligent and extremely articulate.

There are many Democrats and liberals who also do not live up to the name of their species. One concerns GMOs (genetically modified organisms). GMOs have been developed by scientists to solve the hunger problem in the world. Farmers are provided the information and technology needed to promote crop growth. Entirely new crops, that are not only safe, but also more healthy, have been developed. Many hundreds of studies have resulted in the consensus that GMOs are safe to eat. The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine commissioned a comprehensive study of the science, and in 2016 their report declared GMOs both safe to eat and environmentally benign. Of the scientists in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, 88% think it’s safe to eat GMO foods. This is almost exactly the same percentage of those scientists who say climate change is real and man-made, the latter a data point regularly used to demonstrate right-wing anti-science craziness. So people on the left also choose to ignore evidence and disbelieve important science they find upsetting. It is also the case, that there will never be 100% agreement on any topic. Rather one uses a measure of the strength of consensus.

Another example is the false belief that vaccines cause autism and other terrible illnesses derives from an excessive mistrust of experts, and the conviction that some vicious conspiracy is behind everything. The study that ignited the hysteria appeared in 1998, when diagnoses of autism had been increasing. A doctor studied ten children who showed autistic behavior after they were vaccinated against measles, mumps, and rubella, published research in a medical journal, and became the guiding light of a new movement.

Replication is the sine qua non of science. This research could not be replicated by other doctors and scientists. Nor could another article of faith, that a mercury-based preservative was the autism trigger, be substantiated. Major study after major study ever since has found stronger and stronger evidence that vaccines do not cause autism. Not until a dozen years after publishing the original paper—after the doctor was stripped of his medial license and found to have acted “dishonestly and irresponsibly” did The Lancet finally retract his study calling it “utterly false.” The other major British journal called it an “elaborate fraud.”

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., had been the movement’s big star, repeating the argument that the U.S. government scientists were “involved in a massive fraud.” So even prominent liberals and Democrats provide doubts about belonging to Homo sapiens.

Other examples could be cited, but the basic point is that all of us can reason in a manner counter to Homo sapiens.

Walking to Work or Doing the Vacuuming Can Extend Your Life

October 2, 2017

The title of this post is identical to the title of an In Brief News piece in the 30 September 2017 issue of the New Scientist. One in 12 early deaths could be prevented with 30 minutes of physical activity, five days a week. And you don’t need to be sweating in a gym. Walking to work and household chores also count. So concludes the world’s largest study of physical activity, which analyzed data from more than 130,000 people in 17 countries. The study lasted seven years and participants were followed-up at least twice over the this period to record information about cardiovascular disease and death.

Scott Lear of McMaster University in Hamilton, Canada and his colleagues found that 150 minutes of activity per week week reduced the risk of early death by 28% and rates of heart disease by a fifth.

If these goals were met, 8% of early deaths over seven years would be prevented (The Lancet, doi.org/cdfc). James Rudd at the University of Cambridge says, “Exercise truly is the best medicine for reducing the odds of an early death.”

HM fears he sees too many people exercising too hard. He was gladdened by this study as he follows the philosophy of famed pitcher Satchel Paige who said that he liked to get the juices jangling.

Also see the healthy memory blog post “To Improve Your Memory, Build Your Hippocampus.” Walking for 40 minutes three times a week increased the volume of that memory important organ, the hippocampus. This also increased serum Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which helps support the survival of existing neurons and encourages the growth and differentiation of new neurons and synapses.

 

© Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com, 2017. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Douglas Griffith and healthymemory.wordpress.com with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.